Per citar aquest document: http://ddd.uab.cat/record/148341
Plant functional traits have globally consistent effects on competition
Kunstler, Georges (Institut national de recherche en sciences et technologie pour l'environnement et l'agriculture (France). UR Ecosystèmes Montagnards)
Falster, Daniel (Macquarie University. Department of Biological Sciences)
Coomes, David A. (University of Cambridge. Forest Ecology and Conservation Group)
Hui, Francis (Australian National University. Mathematical Sciences Institute)
Kooyman, Robert M. (Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust (Sydney, N.S.W.))
Laughlin, Daniel C. (University of Waikato. Environmental Research Institute)
Poorter, L. (Wageningen University. Forest Ecology and Forest Management Group)
Vanderwel, Mark (University of Regina. Biology Department)
Vieilledent, Ghislain (Centre de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développment)
Wright, S. Joseph (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)
Aiba, Masahiro (Tohoku University (Japó). Graduate School of Life Sciences)
Baraloto, Christopher (Institut national de la recherche agronomique (França). Unité Mixte de Recherches Ecologie des Forêts de Guyane)
Caspersen, John (University of Toronto. Faculty of forestry)
Cornelissen, J. Hans C. (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Department of Ecological Science)
Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie (Centre de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développment)
Hanewinkel, Marc (Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Wald, Schnee und Landschaft)
Herault, Bruno (Institut national de la recherche agronomique (França). Unité Mixte de Recherches Ecologie des Forêts de Guyane)
Kattge, J. (Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie)
Kurokawa, Hiroko (Tohoku University (Japó). Graduate School of Life Sciences)
Onoda, Yusuke (Kyoto Daigaku. Graduate School of Agriculture)
Peñuelas, Josep (Centre de Recerca Ecològica i Aplicacions Forestals)
Poorter, Hendrik (Forschungszentrum Jülich)
Uriarte, Maria (Columbia University. Departament of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology)
Richardson, Sarah (Manaaki Whenua-Landcare Research New Zealand)
Ruiz-Benito, Paloma (Universidad de Alcalá de Henares. Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida)
Sun, I-Fang (Guo li dong hua da xue. Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies)
Ståhl, Göran (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Department of Forest Resource Management)
Swenson, Nathan G. (University of Maryland. Department of Biology)
Thompson, Jill (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology)
Westerlund, Bertil (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Department of Forest Resource Management)
Wirth, Christian (Karl-Marx-Universität Leipzig. Institute for Systematic, Botany and Functional Biodiversity)
Zavala, Miguel A. (Universidad de Alcalá de Henares. Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida)
Zeng, Hongcheng (University of Toronto. Faculty of forestry)
Zimmerman, Jess K. (Universidad de Puerto Rico. Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales)
Zimmermann, Niklaus E. (Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Wald, Schnee und Landschaft)
Westoby, Mark (Macquarie University. Department of Biological Sciences)

Data: 2016
Resum: Phenotypic traits and their associated trade-offs have been shown to have globally consistent effects on individual plant physiological functions1, 2, 3, but how these effects scale up to influence competition, a key driver of community assembly in terrestrial vegetation, has remained unclear4. Here we use growth data from more than 3 million trees in over 140,000 plots across the world to show how three key functional traits—wood density, specific leaf area and maximum height—onsistently influence competitive interactions. Fast maximum growth of a species was correlated negatively with its wood density in all biomes, and positively with its specific leaf area in most biomes. Low wood density was also correlated with a low ability to tolerate competition and a low competitive effect on neighbours, while high specific leaf area was correlated with a low competitive effect. Thus, traits generate trade-offs between performance with competition versus performance without competition, a fundamental ingredient in the classical hypothesis that the coexistence of plant species is enabled via differentiation in their successional strategies. Competition within species was stronger than between species, but an increase in trait dissimilarity between species had little influence in weakening competition. No benefit of dissimilarity was detected for specific leaf area or wood density, and only a weak benefit for maximum height. Our trait-based approach to modelling competition makes generalization possible across the forest ecosystems of the world and their highly diverse species composition.
Nota: Número d'acord de subvenció EC/FP7/299340
Drets: Tots els drets reservats
Llengua: Anglès
Document: article ; recerca ; acceptedVersion
Matèria: Community ecology ; Forest ecology ; Plant ecology
Publicat a: Nature, Vol. 529, Issue 7585 (Jan. 2016) , p. 204-207, ISSN 0028-0836

DOI: 10.1038/nature16476


Post-print
27 p, 1.6 MB

El registre apareix a les col·leccions:
Documents de recerca > Documents dels grups de recerca de la UAB > Centres i grups de recerca (producció científica) > Ciències > CREAF (Centre de Recerca Ecològica i d'Aplicacions Forestals)
Articles > Articles de recerca
Articles > Articles publicats

 Registre creat el 2016-04-04, darrera modificació el 2016-07-18



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