Web of Science: 19 citas, Scopus: 22 citas, Google Scholar: citas,
Genome-wide SNP data unveils the globalization of domesticated pigs
Yang, Bin (Jiangxi Agricultural University. National Key Laboratory for Pig Genetic Improvement and Production Technology)
Cui, Leilei (Jiangxi Agricultural University. National Key Laboratory for Pig Genetic Improvement and Production Technology)
Pérez-Enciso, Miguel (Centre de Recerca en Agrigenòmica)
Traspov, Aleksei (Federal Science Center for Animal Husbandry named after Academy Member L.K. Ernst)
Crooijmans, Richard P. M. A. (Wageningen Universiteit. Animal Breeding and Genetics Group)
Zinovieva, Natalia (Federal Science Center for Animal Husbandry named after Academy Member L.K. Ernst)
Schook, Lawrence B. (University of Illinois. Institute of Genomic Biology)
Archibald, Alan (Roslin Institute. Division of Genetics and Genomics)
Gatphayak, Kesinee (Mahāwitthayālai Chīang Mai. Animal and Aquatic Sciences)
Knorr, Christophe (Universität Göttingen. Department of Animal Sciences)
Triantafyllidis, Alex (Aristoteleio Panepistēmio Thessalonikēs. Department of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology)
Alexandri, Panoraia (Aristoteleio Panepistēmio Thessalonikēs. Department of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology)
Semiadi, Gono (Lembaga Ilmu Pengetahuan Indonesia)
Hanotte, Olivier (The University of Nottingham. School of Biology)
Dias, Deodália (Universidade de Lisboa. Faculdade de Ciências)
Dovč, Peter (Univerza v Ljubljani. Department of Animal Science)
Uimari, Pekka (Helsingin yliopisto. Department of Agricultural Sciences)
Iacolina, Laura (Università degli studi di Sassari)
Scandura, Massimo (Università degli studi di Sassari. Dipartimento di Scienze per la natura e le risorse ambientali)
Groenen, Martien A. M. (Wageningen Universiteit. Animal Breeding and Genetics Group)
Huang,Lusheng (Jiangxi Agricultural University. National Key Laboratory for Pig Genetic Improvement and Production Technology)
Megens, Hendrik-Jan (Wageningen Universiteit. Animal Breeding and Genetics Group)

Fecha: 2017
Resumen: Background: pigs were domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia early during the agricultural revolution, and have since been transported and traded across the globe. Here, we present a worldwide survey on 60K genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for 2093 pigs, including 1839 domestic pigs representing 122 local and commercial breeds, 215 wild boars, and 39 out-group suids, from Asia, Europe, America, Oceania and Africa. The aim of this study was to infer global patterns in pig domestication and diversity related to demography, migration, and selection. - Results: a deep phylogeographic division reflects the dichotomy between early domestication centers. In the core Eastern and Western domestication regions, Chinese pigs show differentiation between breeds due to geographic isolation, whereas this is less pronounced in European pigs. The inferred European origin of pigs in the Americas, Africa, and Australia reflects European expansion during the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Human-mediated introgression, which is due, in particular, to importing Chinese pigs into the UK during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, played an important role in the formation of modern pig breeds. Inbreeding levels vary markedly between populations, from almost no runs of homozygosity (ROH) in a number of Asian wild boar populations, to up to 20% of the genome covered by ROH in a number of Southern European breeds. Commercial populations show moderate ROH statistics. For domesticated pigs and wild boars in Asia and Europe, we identified highly differentiated loci that include candidate genes related to muscle and body development, central nervous system, reproduction, and energy balance, which are putatively under artificial selection. - Conclusions: key events related to domestication, dispersal, and mixing of pigs from different regions are reflected in the 60K SNP data, including the globalization that has recently become full circle since Chinese pig breeders in the past decades started selecting Western breeds to improve local Chinese pigs. Furthermore, signatures of ongoing and past selection, acting at different times and on different genetic backgrounds, enhance our insight in the mechanism of domestication and selection. The global diversity statistics presented here highlight concerns for maintaining agrodiversity, but also provide a necessary framework for directing genetic conservation.
Nota: Número d'acord de subvenció EC/H2020/677353
Nota: Número d'acord de subvenció EC/H2020/656697
Nota: Número d'acord de subvenció MINECO/AGL2013-41834-R
Nota: Número d'acord de subvenció MINECO/AGL2010-14822
Nota: Altres ajuts: This study is supported by National Production Technology System for the Pig Industry in China (nycytx-008)
Derechos: Aquest document està subjecte a una llicència d'ús Creative Commons. Es permet la reproducció total o parcial, la distribució, la comunicació pública de l'obra i la creació d'obres derivades, fins i tot amb finalitats comercials, sempre i quan es reconegui l'autoria de l'obra original. Creative Commons
Lengua: Anglès.
Documento: article ; recerca ; publishedVersion
Publicado en: Genetics selection evolution, Vol. 49 (2017) , art. 71, ISSN 1297-9686

DOI: 10.1186/s12711-017-0345-y
PMID: 28934946


15 p, 2.4 MB

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Documentos de investigación > Documentos de los grupos de investigación de la UAB > Centros y grupos de investigación (producción científica) > Ciencias > CRAG (Centro de Investigación en Agrigenómica)
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 Registro creado el 2017-11-28, última modificación el 2019-10-02



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