Web of Science: 1 cites, Scopus: 3 cites, Google Scholar: cites,
History of fires and vegetation since the Neolithic in the Cantabrian Mountains (Spain)
Carracedo, Virginia (Universidad de Cantabria. Departamento de Geografía, Urbanismo y Ordenación del Territorio)
Cunill, Raquel (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Department de Geografia)
García-Codron, Juan Carlos (Universidad de Cantabria. Departamento de Geografía, Urbanismo y Ordenación del Territorio)
Pèlachs Mañosa, Albert (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Departament de Geografia)
Pérez Obiol, Ramon (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Departament de Biologia Animal, de Biologia Vegetal i d'Ecologia)
Soriano López, Juan Manuel (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Departament de Geografia)

Data: 2018
Resum: Fire has been one of the main causes of disturbance of vegetation over time, and since the Neolithic has become an irreplaceable tool for the opening of forest spaces and maintenance of pastures. Previous studies showed that the intensity and effects of wildfires are related to the biomass and controlled by climate factors. However, in regions such as Cantabria, where agriculture and livestock have spread throughout the territory since prehistory, fires should also be closely related to human land uses. The aim of this paper was to investigate the history of fires and vegetation since the Neolithic in the Cantabrian Mountains, using sedimentary charcoal and pollen data to study the role of human activities in the processes that have shaped ecosystems throughout the Holocene. The asynchrony and quantitative differences in the results obtained at different sites indicate significant variations in fire patterns at regional scale since the Neolithic, although the type and size of each basin also had a strong influence on charcoal accumulation. Maximum values for charcoal accumulation rate at La Molina were observed between the Neolithic and the Bronze Age but occurred after about 3500 cal years BP at El Cueto de la Avellanosa. At El Sertal, low charcoal accumulation rate values were observed, probably because the sequence begins in a space that already had been cleared; the maximum values occurred during the most recent millennium. These data provide evidence that fire has been a key factor in forest retreat and in maintaining open landscapes since the Neolithic.
Nota: Número d'acord de subvenció MINECO/CSO2012‐39680‐C02‐01
Nota: Número d'acord de subvenció MINECO/CSO 2012‐39680‐C02‐02
Nota: Número d'acord de subvenció 2014/SGR-1090
Drets: Tots els drets reservats.
Llengua: Anglès.
Document: article ; recerca ; acceptedVersion
Matèria: Cantabrian Mountains ; Climate, fire ; Neolithic ; Palynology ; Sedimentary charcoal ; Cantabrian Mountains, climate, fire, Neolithic, palynology, sedimentary charcoal
Publicat a: Land degradation & development, Vol. 29, issue 7, special issue (July 2018) , p. 2060-2072, ISSN 1085-3278

DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2891


Disponible a partir de: 2019-07-30
Post-print

El registre apareix a les col·leccions:
Articles > Articles de recerca
Articles > Articles publicats

 Registre creat el 2018-02-21, darrera modificació el 2019-02-02



   Favorit i Compartir