Web of Science: 7 citas, Scopus: 9 citas, Google Scholar: citas,
Contrasting responses of autumn-leaf senescence to daytime and night-time warming
Wu, Chaoyang (Chinese Academy of Sciences. Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research)
Wang, Xiaoyue (Chinese Academy of Sciences. Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research)
Wang, Huanjiong (Chinese Academy of Sciences. Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research)
Ciais, Philippe (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement)
Peñuelas, Josep (Centre de Recerca Ecològica i Aplicacions Forestals)
Myneni, Ranga B. (Boston University. Department of Earth and Environment)
Desai, Ankur R. (University of Wisconsin–Madison. Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences)
Gough, Christopher M. (Virginia Commonwealth University. Department of Biology)
Gonsamo, Alemu (University of Toronto. Department of Geography and Planning)
Black, Andrew T. (University of British Columbia. Faculty of Land and Food Systems)
Jassal, Rachhpal S. (University of British Columbia. Faculty of Land and Food Systems)
Ju, Weimin (Nanjing University. International Institute for Earth System Science)
Yuan, Wenping (Sun Yat-Sen University. School of Atmospheric Sciences)
Fu, Yongshuo (Beijing Normal University. College of Water Sciences)
Shen, Miaogen (Chinese Academy of Sciences. Center for Excellence in Tibetan Earth Science)
Li, Shihua (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China. School of Resources and Environment)
Liu, Ronggao (Chinese Academy of Sciences. State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System)
Chen, Jing M. (University of Toronto. Department of Geography and Planning)
Ge, Quansheng (University of Toronto. Department of Geography and Planning)

Fecha: 2018
Resumen: Plant phenology is a sensitive indicator of climate change1,2,3,4 and plays an important role in regulating carbon uptake by plants5,6,7. Previous studies have focused on spring leaf-out by daytime temperature and the onset of snow-melt time8,9, but the drivers controlling leaf senescence date (LSD) in autumn remain largely unknown10,11,12. Using long-term ground phenological records (14,536 time series since the 1900s) and satellite greenness observations dating back to the 1980s, we show that rising pre-season maximum daytime (Tday) and minimum night-time (Tnight) temperatures had contrasting effects on the timing of autumn LSD in the Northern Hemisphere (> 20° N). If higher Tday leads to an earlier or later LSD, an increase in Tnight systematically drives LSD to occur oppositely. Contrasting impacts of daytime and night-time warming on drought stress may be the underlying mechanism. Our LSD model considering these opposite effects improved autumn phenology modelling and predicted an overall earlier autumn LSD by the end of this century compared with traditional projections. These results challenge the notion of prolonged growth under higher autumn temperatures, suggesting instead that leaf senescence in the Northern Hemisphere will begin earlier than currently expected, causing a positive climate feedback.
Nota: Número d'acord de subvenció EC/FP7/610028
Derechos: Tots els drets reservats
Lengua: Anglès.
Documento: article ; recerca ; acceptedVersion
Publicado en: Nature climate change, Vol. 8 (Dec. 2018) , p. 1092-1096, ISSN 1758-678X

DOI: 10.1038/s41558-018-0346-z


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El registro aparece en las colecciones:
Documentos de investigación > Documentos de los grupos de investigación de la UAB > Centros y grupos de investigación (producción científica) > Ciencias > CREAF (Centre de Recerca Ecològica i d'Aplicacions Forestals) > Imbalance-P
Artículos > Artículos de investigación
Artículos > Artículos publicados

 Registro creado el 2019-01-09, última modificación el 2019-07-21



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