Scopus: 1 citations, Web of Science: 1 citations,
On the causes of trends in the seasonal amplitude of atmospheric CO₂
Piao, Shilong (Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science)
Liu, Zhuo (Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science)
Wang, Yilong (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment)
Ciais, Philippe (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de L’Environnement)
Yao, Yitong (Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science)
Peng, Shushi (Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science)
Chevallier, Frédéric (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de L’Environnement)
Friedlingstein, Pierre (University of Exeter. College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences)
Janssens, Ivan A. (Universiteit Antwerpen. Departement Biologie)
Peñuelas, Josep (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Departament de Biologia Animal, de Biologia Vegetal i d'Ecologia)
Sitch, Stephen (University of Exeter. College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences)
Wang, Tao (Zhongguo ke xue yuan. Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research)

Date: 2018
Abstract: No consensus has yet been reached on the major factors driving the observed increase in the seasonal amplitude of atmospheric CO₂ in the northern latitudes. In this study, we used atmospheric CO₂ records from 26 northern hemisphere stations with a temporal coverage longer than 15 years, and an atmospheric transport model prescribed with net biome productivity (NBP) from an ensemble of nine terrestrial ecosystem models, to attribute change in the seasonal amplitude of atmospheric CO₂. We found significant (p < . 05) increases in seasonal peak‐to‐trough CO₂ amplitude (AMPP‐T) at nine stations, and in trough‐to‐peak amplitude (AMPT‐P) at eight stations over the last three decades. Most of the stations that recorded increasing amplitudes are in Arctic and boreal regions (>50°N), consistent with previous observations that the amplitude increased faster at Barrow (Arctic) than at Mauna Loa (subtropics). The multi‐model ensemble mean (MMEM) shows that the response of ecosystem carbon cycling to rising CO₂ concentration (eCO₂) and climate change are dominant drivers of the increase in AMPP‐T and AMPT‐P in the high latitudes. At the Barrow station, the observed increase of AMPP‐T and AMPT‐P over the last 33 years is explained by eCO₂ (39% and 42%) almost equally than by climate change (32% and 35%). The increased carbon losses during the months with a net carbon release in response to eCO₂ are associated with higher ecosystem respiration due to the increase in carbon storage caused by eCO₂ during carbon uptake period. Air‐sea CO₂ fluxes (10% for AMPP‐T and 11% for AMPT‐P) and the impacts of land‐use change (marginally significant 3% for AMPP‐T and 4% for AMPT‐P) also contributed to the CO₂ measured at Barrow, highlighting the role of these factors in regulating seasonal changes in the global carbon cycle.
Note: Número d'acord de subvenció EC/FP7/610028
Rights: Tots els drets reservats
Language: Anglès
Document: article ; recerca ; acceptedVersion
Subject: Amplitude of atmospheric CO₂ ; Attribution ; Climate change ; CO₂ fertilization effect ; Detection ; Land‐use change
Published in: Global change biology, Vol. 24, issue 2 (Feb. 2018) , p. 608-616, ISSN 1354-1013

DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13909


Available from: 2019-02-28
Article. Post-print

Available from: 2019-02-28
Material suplementari. Post-print

The record appears in these collections:
Research literature > UAB research groups literature > Research Centres and Groups (scientific output) > Experimental sciences > CREAF (Centre de Recerca Ecològica i d'Aplicacions Forestals) > Imbalance-P
Articles > Research articles
Articles > Published articles

 Record created 2018-04-25, last modified 2018-05-02



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